Italian Cities in Review: Torino (Turin)

San Lorenzo Turin

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n an attempt to spread our travel net ever further afield, we grabbed our camera and boarded a three-hour train to Torino, the first capital of unified Italy and home to its once Royal family, the House of Savoy. This city has been given two strikingly dissimilar mottos: “the Detroit of Italy” and “little Paris.” While car manufacture is one of its most important industries, I think you’ll agree from the photos below that the French influence dominates in this mini Paris on the Po.
 
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What is in Season: Black Cabbage (Cavolo Nero)

Cavolo_Nero_RecipeThe cold weather is here in Italy and all those hearty winter veggies are starting to show up at my local market. One of my favorites—for its flavor, health benefits*, and versatility in the kitchen—is the great cavolo nero, also known as black cabbage.
 
Before coming to Italy I had never even heard of this leafy green vegetable, though I may have unconsciously seen it wedged in with the other dark winter greens. I probably thought it was some unknown kind of cabbage or even kale. In fact, the great black cabbage goes by a slew of other names that echo this easy-to-make mistake, including Tuscan Kale, Tuscan cabbage, Italian kale, and, my favorite, dinosaur kale. The “dinosaur-ness” of the dino kale is not in reference to the plant’s size, which, by the way (overlooking my rather modest sized bunches), can be up to 2 feet long! The dinosaur refers to the leaves’ very particular texture, which is distinctly bubbly and rippled and in fact, rather t.rex-like. Once I learned this, I had a hard time seeing anything other than the skin of a triceratops sitting in my fridge, but I am working on moving past that and the below recipe has really helped.
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Gluten Free in Italy? No Problem.

Gluten_free_recipeWhen it comes to food in Italy, my rule is: “try everything!” This becomes a bit harder once I learn what certain things are (sorry trippa and lampredotto, you never had a chance), but in general, I try and stick to it. I often feel a little bad for vegetarians traveling in Italy (Pancetta! Supplì! Bistecca!), and extra sorry for vegans (in Italy this eating concept is now generally recognized though not totally understood). However, there is one unexpected faction of diners that should have no fear eating their hearts out in Italy: visitors with celiac disease. Your immediate thought may be: “I am sorry, but are we talking about the land of pasta and focaccia?” And I say to you: “Yes, yes we are.”
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